ServerSuit Technical How-To’s



July 03 2021

One of the most fundamental parts of any operating systems is managing memory; the subsystem conveniently known as the Memory Management Unit or MMU. This subsystem is a very complex one but, fortunately for us, it's very well documented. Today's article breaks it all down.

July 01 2021

Why backup?

While your mileage may vary, most people hold critical data on their servers. If it's just a server for personal use, that's still time, resources, and effort invested in setting it up and keeping it running. Time that now has to be backtracked and spent again on reconfiguring everything.

If you're running the server for business or research, there will be a lot of people directly dependent on that server being up. Going down means losing money and losing trust, on top of the resource and time investment I already mentioned. 

How ready are your servers for hardware failure? Electrical outage? Natural disaster? A good backup strategy will account and compensate for as many potential interruptions as possible.

June 29 2021

As seen in Install crontab on CentOS, the crontab package in CentOS is vixie-cron. Click the article for directions!

May 17 2021

With RHEL 7 / CentOS 7, firewalld was introduced to manage iptables, which causes the classic way to set up iptables to break. Click the article to see what you can do.

 

May 14 2021

When Installing git, you sometimes run into a problem where the version that gets installed is not the most current one. If you follow the steps we included here, getting the most current version of git should never be a problem again.

May 12 2021

Opening a firewall is as easy as a few simple entries, click the article and see for yourself.

March 10 2021

Unzipping a file couldn't be easier, just make sure you have unzip installed.

March 01 2021

Setting a new user as a sudoer couldn't be easier.

February 22 2021

Using the command line to determine the total directory size is pretty simple using the "du" command.

February 17 2021

Type man tar for more information, but this command should do the trick